Tag Archives: Bamboo

September Rolag Club: Michaelmas

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September Rolag Club: Michaelmas

Welcome to Forgotten Festivals Rolag Club!

This month we are celebrating Michaelmas on the 29th of September.

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Michaelmas is named for St. Michael, the biblical archangel, and the feast of Michaelmas was important as one of the old quarter days which neatly divided the year into four. (The other quarter days were Christmas, on the 25th of December, Lady Day on the 25th of March, and Midsummer, taken as the 24th of June.) Michaelmas was the traditional day to settle debts and to change one’s employment. Hiring Fairs allowed employers and workers to make new arrangements. Workers for hire would advertise their skills by wearing an emblem of their trade: a crook for a shepherd, or a mop for a maid, etc. If a new employer was found, this token would be swapped for a ribbon and a shilling to spend at the fair.

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Emblems of the spinner’s trade.

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A shilling to spend!

The themes of this rolag box are the angel, the michaelmas daisy, and the tools of the trade. I hope you enjoy it.

In this box you should find:

  • The story of Michaelmas.
  • 10g of rolags in “Michaelmas Daisies” – 63% Merino, 30% Hemp, 7% Tussah Silk.
  • 20g of rolags in “Archangel” – 50% Merino, 25% Bamboo, 25% Faux Cashmere and a hint of Angelina.
  • A handspun mini skein in “Halo”.
  • Tea in Turmeric Gold and Three Chamomile blends.
  • Stitch markers: Spinners’ emblems of a spinning wheel & a skein of yarn.
  • A shilling – don’t spend it all at once!
  • A hand-woven Wrist Distaff.
  • 3 Michaelmas Daisy buttons from Forest Valley Designs.

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A mini skein of ‘Halo’.

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Michaelmas Daisy buttons by Forest Valley Designs.

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A notions pouch from Forest Valley Designs.

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A wrist distaff for handspinners (especially spindle spinners).

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Wrist distaff in detail: Tablet-woven band by Story Skeins.

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Tea in Turmeric Gold for the angel’s halo, and Three Chamomile for the daisy family.

 

 

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October Rolag Club: Punkie Night

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October Rolag Club: Punkie Night

Welcome to Forgotten Festivals Rolag Club!

This month we are celebrating Punkie Night on the 27th of October.

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Punkie Night is a festival local to the village of Hinton St. George in Somerset. The celebrations echo similar customs associated with Halloween, and Mischief Night, as celebrated elsewhere in the country. The festival centres around the Punkie Lanterns, each elaborately carved from a mangelwurzel. The story of Punkie Night’s origin tells of the men of the village, who had visited a local fair. When the time came to return home, they were too drunk to find their way. Needless to say, the women had to go and round up their husbands, and took Punkie Lanterns to light their way.

Nowadays the village children spend the week preceding Punkie Night making their lanterns. On the last Thursday in October they parade through the village with their lanterns and sing the Punkie Night song. They go from door to door, and where once they collected candles from their neighbours, they now collect money.

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It’s Punkie Night tonight,

It’s Punkie Night tonight.

Give us a candle, give us a light,

If you don’t you’ll get a fright.

This box is based on the warming winter traditions as autumn sets in. Your rolags and mini skein are based on the idea of a pumpkin spice latte, and the spice theme carries on to your star anise tea. Bedtime tea reminds me of the nights drawing in, and I came across a set of wonderful autumn recipes, so you will find a link to these too. I have gone totally OTT on our guest makers for our last box, so we start where we began, with Hooklicious stitch markers (I’m pretty sure no one’s ever asked Hayley to make mini mangelwurzels before!), we have fabulous soap from Magpie and Goblin (Sarra told me so many times not to eat it, because it really does look and smell good enough to eat. But don’t.), and we have some gorgeous mini wax melts from Madame Tartlet to keep your rooms warm and cozy. Lastly, in deference to the modern Punkie Night, I’ve scattered a few gold coins amongst your treats.

I’d like to say an enormous thank you to you for joining me on my first rolag club adventure. I have thoroughly enjoyed exploring our season of festivals and creating these boxes of fibre and treats for you. I have fresh, new ideas for 2017 and hope you will join me for more fibre exploration next year.

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In this box you should find:

  • The story of Punkie Night
  • 10g of rolags in “Pumpkin” – 67% Merino, 33% Banana
  • 20g of rolags in “Spice” – 55% Merino, 15% Black Diamond Bamboo, 15% Faux Mohair, 15% Mulberry Silk and a hint of angelina.
  • A handspun mini skein in “Latte”
  • Tea in “Bedtime” and “Star Anise and Cinnamon” blends
  • Stitch markers by Hooklicious in candle and mangelwurzel designs.
  • Autumn squash recipes at: tinyurl.com/RolagRecipes
  • Wax melts from Madame Tartlet’s Wax Emporium
  • Handmade soap from Magpie and Goblin
  • And finally, some celebratory chocolate coins.

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A plethora of makers.

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Candles and Mangelwurzels from Hooklicious.

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Spicy, nutty handmade soap from Magpie & Goblin.

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Mini wax melts from Madame Tartlet’s Wax Emporium

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And to all, a goodnight!

March Rolag Club: Carling Sunday

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March Rolag Club: Carling Sunday

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Welcome to Forgotten Festivals Rolag Club!

This month we are Celebrating Carling Sunday on the 13th March

“Tid, Mid, Miseray, Carlin, Palm, Pace-Egg Day”

So goes the Northern saying, which helps people remember the various Lenten Sundays. Tid comes from the Te Deum hymn, sung on the 2nd Sunday. Mid and Miseray are from the Mi Deus and the Miserere Mei, sung on the 3rd and 4th Sundays. Palm Sunday is the 6th Sunday in Lent and Pace Egg refers to Easter Day, Pace being a corruption of Pasch, from the Latin and Greek root of ‘Easter’. And that leaves us with Carlin.

Many people will know the 5th Sunday of Lent as Passion Sunday, but in certain areas, most particularly the North East of England, it became known as Carling, or Carlin, Sunday after the peas which were traditionally eaten on that day.

No one seems to know why this food became associated with this festival. Carlins probably originated in monastic gardens, and pulses formed a large part of the monks’ diet. Pea dishes were often eaten throughout lent as a good (and ‘approved’) source of protein. There are lots of myths and stories about the carlin pea and how they became associated with the northern regions. Here is a typical example:

Carlins are said to have rescued the people of Newcastle-upon-Tyne during the civil war. Newcastle, a royalist city, had been under siege by parliamentarian allies for four months and food supplies were becoming exhausted. Legend tells of a cargo ship from europe which managed to evade the blockade, and whose cargo of carlins saved the people from starvation.

To celebrate Carling Sunday, your rolags are inspired by purple, the traditional colour of passion,  and the rich greens of the pea plant. Your handspun mini skein was inspired by the colours of pea flowers. I have included a recipe for carlings, and though I tried to source some pea seeds, it seems you can’t, so I have included information on how to adopt this variety. Your tea reflects the themes of Passion Sunday, and the unfortunate after-effects of eating large quantities of pulses … Finally we have two guest makers this month. Jennifer from Forest Valley Designs has made the unique stitch markers, and Becca from Get Hooked Crafts has made the stunning WIP bags.

I hope you enjoy it all.

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“Passion” and “Greens” rolags, inspired by Carling Sunday.

In this box you should find:

  • 20g rolags in “Passion” – 77% Bluefaced Leicester, 11.5% Bamboo, 11.5% Faux Cashmere and a hint of angelina.
  • 10g rolags in “Greens, shoots and peas” – 84% Merino, 16% Ramie and some wool neps.
  • The story of Carling Sunday
  • A handspun mini skein in “Pea flowers”
  • Tea in ‘Love’ and ‘Stomach Ease’ blends.
  • Stitch markers from Forest Valley Designs.
  • WIP bags from Get Hooked Crafts.
  • A recipe for carlings
  • Adopt the carlin pea
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“Pea Flowers” handspun mini skein.

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Stitch markers by Forest Valley Designs

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WIP bag from Get Hooked Crafts

 

There are several recipes recorded for the carlin pea. I have also discovered that the day after Carling Sunday was known as Farting Monday, so don’t say I didn’t warn you! Though I did include some Stomach Ease tea.

 

Carlings

225g dried green peas

50g fresh breadcrumbs

1 onion, finely chopped

½ teaspoon mixed herbs

Salt and pepper

25g butter

Soak the peas overnight in cold water. The next day, drain and put into a large saucepan. Add 750 ml water and bring to the boil. Boil steadily for 2 hours until the peas are tender. Leave to cool. Mix with the breadcrumbs, onion, herbs and seasoning to make a stiff mixture. Shape into cakes and fry in the butter until brown.

Reference: Cattern Cakes and Lace by Julia Jones and Barbara Deer, Dorling Kindersley 1987

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The carlin pea in flower.

 

Every Good Thing

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Every Good Thing

Background:

I was sent a braid to spin for a swap. I wanted to do something really special with it so decided to ply it with a luscious blend from Countess Ablaze:

The supplied blend was all light and brightness and fun, fresh colours. The darker blend was deep and subtle and more mysterious. They seemed like two sides of the same story, and as I wanted the yarn to arrive as a Mothers’ Day gift, so the story came about.

Story:

1. The Light: “Nurture”

Watching them breathe whilst they sleep.

Sleepy eyes and rosy cheeks when they wake.

Joyful cuddles and time together.

Precious moments, rushing by too fast.

Playing in the park: candyfloss and water slides.

Making daisy chains in the sun.

Bedtime stories.

Sleep.

2. The Dark: “Indulgence”

Having a day all to myself.

Dropping responsibility and embracing freedom.

Staying up late and sneakily raiding the chocolate stash!

Because I’m a grown-up (so they say) and it’s allowed.

Doing something just for me. Just because I want to.

And looking forward to being with them again.

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Information:

Title: Every Good Thing

Composition: Fibre supplied

Weight: 200g / 13 WPI / DK

Length: 468m / 512yd approx.

Care: Hand wash only. Dry flat.

Details:

Date: February 2016

Skein code: 0086

Fibre:

  1. Unknown blend – Looks like Merino, Silk & Angelina.
  2. “Gothika” – Merino, Black Bamboo & Rainbow Trilobal.

Source:

  1. Spin City
  2. Countess Ablaze

Status: Swapped

December Rolag Club: Tolling the Devil’s Knell

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December Rolag Club: Tolling the Devil’s Knell

December 24th: Tolling the Devil’s Knell

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Welcome to Forgotten Festivals Rolag Club!

So many traditional celebrations fall in December. It seems almost universal for a culture to need a cheering festival of light as the days reach their shortest point. With so many festivals remembered and still celebrated, it has been a challenge to choose a forgotten one. This celebration is not so much forgotten as lesser-known outside of the local area.

This month we are celebrating Tolling the Devil’s Knell on December 24th.

Tolling the Devil’s Knell is a tradition local to Dewsbury in Yorkshire and dates back to the middle ages. The legend tells that in 1434, Sir Thomas de Soothill, in a fit of rage,  committed the  murder of a servant. As penance for his crime, he donated a tenor bell to his parish church in Dewsbury. The bell came to bear his name, being known as “Black Tom of Soothill”. Sir Thomas is credited with starting the tradition of tolling this bell, once for each year since the birth of Christ, ending at midnight, just as Christmas day begins. This was probably not such a mammoth task in the time of Sir Thomas as it is in 2015! The tradition continues each year at Dewsbury Minster, only pausing during the war years. Dewsbury Minster’s website lists all the bells in its bell tower and their inscriptions. The tenor bell, “Black Tom”, is inscribed:

I shall be here if treated just

When they are mouldering in the dust

Bells are the dominant theme of this box, inspiring one set of rolags, the stitch markers and the extra treat. Further inspiration comes from the traditional sights, scents and tastes of this season. I hope you enjoy it.

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In this box you will find:

  • An introduction to the tradition of “Tolling the Devil’s Knell”
  • 20g of rolags in ”Medieval Metal” – 60% Merino, 25% black diamond bamboo, 7.5% gold stellina, 7.5% bronze stellina.
  • 10g of rolags in “Evergreen” – 60% Shetland, 40% Bamboo.
  • Seed beads in “Holly Berry” – be careful when you open these!
  • A Handspun mini skein in “Jack Frost” – Falkland plied with glitter thread.
  • A set of stitch markers.
  • Tea in “Three Cinnamon” and “Spicy Chai” flavours.
  • A winter-spiced tealight.
  • A chocolate bell.

 

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Eat Your Greens

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Eat Your Greens

Background:

This was another swap with a lovely and talented lady. She wanted a complete surprise so I thought I’d spoil her with a Hilltop Cloud gradient set. The fibre was called “Cabbage Leaf” and inspired the concept behind “Eat Your Greens.”

Story:

I saw a cabbage flower once, in the place I’d least expect it. Nestling, hiding its face, but placed at the centre of everything, radiating nature’s elegance.

It was in a flower display in a church. And it wasn’t even harvest! It had been picked for its subtle beauty.

Was this the cabbage I knew? From school dinners and uneaten meals. The two ideas didn’t go together. Incongruous was the word.

But now I have a new idea of what ‘cabbage’ is.

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Information:

Title: Eat Your Greens

Composition: 55% Merino, 30% Corriedale, 15% Bamboo.

Weight: 140g / 16 WPI / Sports weight

Length: 539m / 590yd approx.

Care: Hand wash only. Dry flat.

Details:

Date: November 2015

Skein code: 0077

Fibre: Handblended Merino, Corriedale and Bamboo.

Source: Hilltop Cloud

Status: Swapped

Magma

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Magma

Background:

I love spinning batts as singles yarn. This beautiful batt from Habetrot fibres was called “Darkness” and inspired this Magma yarn, which in turn inspired its owner to design and make this “Queen of Hearts” ponchette. You can see the gradient yarn worked up into the pattern on the ravelry link.

Story:

You think the earth is dark and cold under your feet? Not a bit of it.

We are clinging to the skin of a boiling sphere of rock.

Heavy elements swirl below, occasionally breaking the surface to remind us of their presence, and power.

Land, that we like to think of as so permanent. That we like to possess, that through history we have fought over again and again, is destroyed and created constantly.

We seek permanence. Yet the stuff of life is change.

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Information:

Title: Magma

Composition: Merino, bamboo, firestar, angelina, tussah silk.

Weight: 100g / 14 WPI / DK

Length: 223m / 244yd approx.

Care: Hand wash only. Dry flat.

Details:

Date: July 2015

Skein code: 0056

Fibre: Handblended batt of merino, bamboo, firestar, angelina, tussah silk.

Source: Habetrot Fibres

Status: Sold